+61 7 3637 2000

WHALE WATCHING BLOG

Tuesday, 28 June 2016
Hit the jackpot with marine life today!

Today’s whale watch was full of marine life, with Humpback whales, Bottlenose dolphins and Green sea turtles sighted! We were lucky enough to come across 2 Bottlenose dolphins crossing paths with 2 Humpback whales, a phenomenal sight as these species are kind of like cousins in the animal kingdom. It makes you wonder if these dolphins and whales were communicating with each other underwater. The guests on board the Tangalooma Jet were also delighted with spectacular breaches, tail slaps and peduncle throws! A total of 7 Humpback whales, 4 Green sea turtles and 22 Bottlenose dolphins were viewed on today’s whale watch.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Monday, 27 June 2016
Whale, hello there!

The Humpback whales definitely put on an exciting show for passengers on board the Tangalooma Jet today! The record was set with the most whales sighted on today’s whale watch, with 20 Humpback whales sighted. These whales sure did burn off some of their fat reserves today, with so much activity going on! We all enjoyed the acrobatic displays that one particular adult whale demonstrated, with breaches and tail slaps galore! It was possible that this whale was trying to send a message out to other pods in the same area. A pod of 3 Bottlenose dolphins was also sighted playing around the boat!

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Sunday, 26 June 2016
Whales everywhere!

The whale watching vessel was surrounded by pods of whales today! 14 whales were spotted for the day, and at one point 3 pods surrounded the Tangalooma Jet. The whales today seemed to all be using the south easterly winds and swell to cruise further north. Great to see so many whales so early into the season!

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Saturday, 25 June 2016
So close to the boat!

Today on board the Tangalooma Jet, a humpback whale got up close and personal to the vessel and guests, and did some huge tail slaps right next to the bow! The whale swam up next to the starboard side then raised its fluke (tail) and slammed it down. Whales are very curious and inquisitive animals, so they regularly come close to the vessel. For the day, 10 whales were sighted and two bottlenose dolphins were spotted near Cape Moreton.

   

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Friday, 24 June 2016
Time to blow off some steam

Today marked a goal driven day on the northward migration of the Humpback whale, with a total of 7 whales sighted. The main behaviour observed from these whales was repeated breaths of fresh air, and the occasional breach and head lunge. At the end of the whale watch, a visit from around 20 Bottlenose dolphins definitely ticked off the day, with dolphins playing around the vessel and breaching out of the water! 

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Thursday, 23 June 2016
Breaching off the bow

Beautiful and calm conditions today on the whale-watch. At one point we were surrounded by 4 pods, with 1 pod right next to the boat slapping and rolling around. Just when we thought that they were leaving us, one huge whale breached off the bow of the boat.

Eco Ranger Chris

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Wednesday, 22 June 2016
Let's clap for those impressive tail slaps!

Tail slaps galore on today’s whale watch! We were lucky enough to get up close and personal with a juvenile female Humpback whale that put on an entertaining show for us, with up to around 20 tail slaps. A tail slap occurs when the whale extends its tail fluke above the water and slaps it, often forcibly, onto the surface of the water; it is quite common for this behaviour to happen multiple times in a row. We were also greeted with an incredible breach by another adult Humpback whale! A total of 10 Humpback whales and a pod of 6 Bottlenose dolphins were sighted today.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Tuesday, 21 June 2016
Breach for the Sky

Today was a spectacular day with 13 whales sighted, the most sightings so far for the 2016 season! The whales were very active with breaches seen from far and then the highlight was two adults breaching just off to the left hand side of the boat!

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Saturday, 18 June 2016
What a flipper of a day!

Todays whale watch was all about the pec slaps! The Tangalooma Jet spent sometime around two adult whales that became very active producing thunder like claps with their huge pectoral fins! Humpback Whales have the largest pectoral fin of any whale with a total length of up to 5m. 4 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Friday, 17 June 2016
Rest day for whales

It seemed to be rest day for the Humpback whales in Moreton Bay, as a mother and calf were spotted staying close to each other and logging. Logging is how whales and dolphins sleep, they switch off half their brain to rest, while the other half is active to remember to surface for air. A total of 2 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Saturday, 11 June 2016
Quandamooka Welcome Whales

Crew and guests were very privileged to be aboard the Tangalooma Jet for the official launch of Tangalooma's 2016 whale watching season. The season was launched in fine form, welcoming dancers and an elder from Quandamooka to welcome the whales (yura yalingblla) to the region by singing and performing sacred rituals like didgeridoo playing and story telling. The Quandamooka people are the traditional custodians of the land, and are the people of the land and sea. On board, they provided guests and crew with a rich insight into the stories of Quandamooka and their peoples strong spiritual connection with the animals from the region, including the majestic Humpback Whale. Conditions were perfect and we were blessed with two juvenile whales coming up close to the vessel during one of the ceremonial songs played by the Quandamooka. A total of 6 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Friday, 10 June 2016
one slap, two slap, three tail slaps!

Today was full of active whales, with a total of 7 spotted on board the Tangalooma Jet. The highlights of the day were pectoral and tail slaps, with one adult female doing several tail slaps while laying upside down on the surface of the water! Pectoral and tail slaps are just some of the many types of behavioural movements that Humpback whales display on their annual migration. The largest pod on the day was three adult males and one adult female, that were joined by two very curious Bottlenose dolphins.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Thursday, 9 June 2016
Mother of a Whale

On board the Tangalooma Jet we spotted a total of 8 Humpback Whales, and its only the second day of the season! Two pods of two males were spotted, with two very large adults and two smaller juveniles. Then we spotted another two pods, each pod was a mother and calf making their way further north. Crew and guests were treated to some curious and playful behaviour displayed by a mother and calf as they zig zagged from either side of the vessel giving all guests on board a great view of them. Calves are always very curious and come close to the boat to have a look at us while we are looking down at them!

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Wednesday, 8 June 2016
First Whales of 2016!!

The Tangalooma Jet went out today for the first Tangalooma Whale Watch of 2016, spotting two juvenile males on what could have been their first solo migration from Antarctica to Northern Queensland. We were even blessed with the first breach of the season! It was perfect conditions out in Moreton Bay with calm waters and the sun shining, such a great start to the season with many mores whales on their way!

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
 
 
Privacy policy