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WHALE WATCHING BLOG

Monday, 29 August 2016
Breach-a-thon

The Humpback whales certainly made a splash on today's whale watch, with some spectacular breaches seen! One adult whale in particular, provided us with an entertaining show as it repeatedly leapt from the water. We also had the opportunity to witness some of their other natural behaviours, with many pectoral flipper and tail slaps! The weather also complimented the whale watch, with crystal clear water and sunny blue skies surrounding the Tangalooma Jet. A total of 7 Humpback whales were viewed today.

Today's whale watch definitely lifted up the excitement levels for the upcoming week of whale watching!

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Sunday, 28 August 2016
Sunday chill day

The Humpback whales were certainly chilled out today, they definitely took advantage that it was a Sunday! These whales were in a relaxed mood as they swam gracefully throughout the calm waters of Moreton Bay Marine Park. An entertaining show was put on by a pod of 4 Humpback whales, as they performed many spy hops and head lunges, obviously they were people watching! We also saw two pods of Common dolphins that swam around the Humpback whales and alongside the Tangalooma Jet. A total of 11 Humpback whales were seen today.

It's incredible to see how undisturbed and relaxed these whales can really be!

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Saturday, 27 August 2016
whales, dolphins, turtles and a manta ray!

Moreton Bay was full of animals today, with all types of marine life spotted from the Tangalooma Jet. It was the first time that a manta ray has been spotted on the cruise, with one spotted just of Cape Moreton! With so many types of habitats in Moreton Bay the marine life is very diverse and guests on board got to witness some of it. In total there were 9 Humpback whales spotted, 15 Bottlenose dolphins, 2 Green sea turtles and 1 Manta ray.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Friday, 26 August 2016
Spy hopping in the weekend

Guests on board the Tangalooma Jet were thrilled to see couple of Humpback whales displaying spy hops! A spy hop is when a whale or dolphin lifts its head out of the water to look around at its surroundings, so you feel like they are people watching while you are whale watching! A total of 15 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Thursday, 25 August 2016
50 dolphins!

The dolphins took the spotlight today with a pod of 50 Inshore Bottlenose dolphins spotted off Cape Moreton! Crew and guests onboard were amazed by the large pod heading north close to the shore and was a great way to finish the whale watch cruise with 12 whales spotted for the day. The whales today were very curious, with two juveniles coming close to the boat and a large adult showing off its aerobic skills by lifting and holding its tail out of the water.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Monday, 22 August 2016
Full of energy!

The Humpback whales were full of energy on today's whale watch! Guests on the Tangalooma Jet were very lucky to watch on at 6 active whales in their natural state, with plenty of behavioural activity exhibited. The whale's were showing off with breach after breach after breach! Passengers were delighted to see an adorable young calf (possibly only a few weeks old) performing many breaches. Towards the end of the whale watch, a pod of Common dolphins surprised us as they surfed the waves created by the Tangalooma Jet. Overall, it was a thrilling whale watch!

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Sunday, 21 August 2016
Breach for the sky!

Guests on board the Tangalooma Jet were treated to an entertaining show put on by one of the calves on today's whale watch. This calf was travelling into the sheltered waters of Moreton Bay with it's mother. The calf delighted us with many breaches and head lunges! Humpback whales have a special colour adaptation called countershading, which means their back (dorsal side) is dark and their underside (ventral side) is white. Countershading protects whales against predators (killer whales) in the ocean as it blends them in with the surrounding environment. These two whales were quite unique, as a higher percentage of their body colour (~70%) was white.

We were also very excited to see a juvenile Hammerhead shark and 3 pods of dolphins enjoying the waters of Moreton Bay Marine Park. A total of 5 Humpback whales were viewed today.

Eco Ranger Tessa

 

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Saturday, 20 August 2016
Bumpy ride worth it

With some strong winds and swell at the north point of Moreton Island, it was a slightly bumpy ride to the whale watching grounds, but it was well worth it with 18 whales spotted! In a few cases, the Tangalooma Jet was surrounded by more than three pods, with several breaches in the distance and then one up close near the end of the cruise. A total of 18 whales and 3 Green sea turtles were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Friday, 19 August 2016
Breaching calves

Newborn calves took the spotlight on todays whale watch, with two spotted doing breaches! It was memorable experience to see such young whales attempting breaches, resulting in just getting their heads out of the water before splashing down. Humpback whales can live up to 50 years so these little guys have a lot more migrations ahead of them. A total of 10 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Thursday, 18 August 2016
Adult showing the juveniles how its done

Recently guests on board the Tangalooma Jet have been witnessing juvenile Humpback whales doing all the breaching, but today we were treated with a fully grown adult doing several breaches! Was a great photo opportunity for guests as the whale was breaching just off Cape Moreton! It wasn't the only whale showing off though, with its companion doing pectoral slaps and other whales breaching in the distance. A total of 11 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Wednesday, 17 August 2016
Juveniles heading home

Today on board the Tangalooma Jet, all the whales spotted were juveniles, with a total of 11 for the day. Interestingly, all were heading south past Cape Moreton, most likely all looking to go back to Antarctica to their feeding grounds. As juveniles are generally the first to start the migration north, they tend to be the first to leave the tropical waters of Queensland. We are expecting to start seeing the larger adults, mothers and calves finishing off the migration in October/November.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Tuesday, 16 August 2016
Well deserved rest

After a busy weekend of non stop breaching, the Humpback whales seemed to be having a rest day today. The Tangalooma Jet spent most of the cruise with a pod of 3 curious juveniles, that were heading south for their return trip to Antarctica. Humpback whales that are heading south are in their second half of their great migration; after spending roughly around a month without feeding, they're keen to head to the colder waters where they can find some krill to feed on. A total of 5 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Monday, 15 August 2016
Magic Monday

What a way to start the working week, with so much breaching activity! The whales certainly put on a captivating show for guests on board the Tangalooma Jet. A pod of 2 adult Humpback whales thrilled us as they repeatedly breached for the sky! At one point, they performed a double breach! It’s incredible to think how these mammals can synchronise their behavioural activity. Just when we thought the whale watch was over, a pod of 2 curious whales enlightened us, as they enjoyed the sheltered waters of Moreton Bay. A total of 8 Humpback whales were seen today.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Sunday, 14 August 2016
Burning off that whale blubber

Guests on board the Tangalooma Jet were thrilled at the sight of so much whale activity on today’s whale watch, with 10 Humpback whales seen! The whales delighted guests with spectacular breaches and peduncle throws. At one point, two juvenile Humpback whales were performing breach after breach, they were definitely burning off their fat reserves! Other marine life also surprised us today with a pod of Bottlenose dolphins and a couple Green sea turtles enjoying the waters amongst the active Humpback whales.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
 
 
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