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WHALE WATCHING BLOG

Tuesday, 26 July 2016
All play on a gloomy day

The clouds in the sky sure didn't stop the Humpback whales from playing around, with 15 spotted today! The whale spotting started early with two juveniles spotted on the western side of Moreton Island, only around 8km from Tangalooma! Out at Cape Moreton, two adults and a juvenile were very playful doing tail and pectoral slaps, and occasionally laying upside down. One solo whale was the highlight though, with continuous breaches out of the water!

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Monday, 25 July 2016
Migaloo's cousin

Today's whale watch was certainly full of activity! For most of the whale watch, guests on the Tangalooma Jet watched on at 4 adult male whales charging towards a mum and her newborn calf. During the breeding season of Humpback whales, the males will compete with the females, where groups of 2-20 males gather around a single female and exhibit a variety of behaviours, particularly charging as we saw today. Another facinating sight was seen today, we came across a juvenile whale with excessive white colouration (approx. 40%) on its skin, meaning the whale was lacking melanin. This was a very unique whale and possibly could be Migaloo's cousin. Migaloo, the rare albino Humpback whale, is currently migrating north and was last sighted in the waters off Iluka, NSW at 1 pm today! On our way back to Tangalooma, we were delighted to see a pod of 4 juvenile whales enjoying the sheltered waters within Moreton Bay. A total of 15 Humpback whales and a pod of 6 Bottlenose dolphins were seen today.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Sunday, 24 July 2016
A restful Sunday

Today's whale watch was definitely a restful day for the Humpback whales. Guests on board the Tangalooma Jet were extremely lucky to see a total of 6 Humpback whales in their restful state.The first juvenile whale observed was logging in the water, meaning it was sleeping by shutting down one half of its brain. When whales and dolphins sleep, they shut down one half of their brain, and the other half remains awake so the animal can surface to breath. We were also very lucky to see a juvenile green sea turtle and a pod of dolphins on today's whale watch. We are all itching with excitement for Migaloo to migrate north across Moreton Bay Marine Park. He is currently around the waters off Northern NSW, so we should expect him to cross into QLD waters within the next few days!

Eco Ranger Tessa

 

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Saturday, 23 July 2016
Coming in closer to the bay

As the Humpback whale migration progresses, more and more whales are starting to head towards Moreton Bay. Today a pod of four juvenile whales were spotted of Cape Moreton heading west towards the bay. They were all very active and entertaining for those on board, coming up close on both sides of the Tangalooma Jet. A total of 9 whales were sighted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Friday, 22 July 2016
Perfect day to spot a calf

Well it was prefect conditions for whale watching out in Moreton Bay, with 8 whales sighted for the day. A mother and calf treated guests with regular surfacing, coming along either side of the Tangalooma Flyer. The little calf may have only just been born so was very special to sight. The cruise was nicely ended with some big splashes from juveniles breaching near Cape Moreton.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Thursday, 21 July 2016
Pair of whales breaching

Out in the beautiful waters of Moreton Bay, a pair of two Humpback whales were showing off their aerial skills with several breaches just off Flinders Reef! The two whales seemed to be communicating with each other by leaping out of the air with the occasional pectoral wave. Guests were ecstatic to be able to witness their methods of interaction. A total of 9 whales were spotted for the day.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Wednesday, 20 July 2016
Breached as bro!

Well the action started straight away on board the Tangalooma Jet, with a solo Humpback whale doing continuous breaches! Guests got to see around 20 breaches from the one whale, then some more from others on the horizon. It was a spectacular day for whale watching with 16 spotted for the day and a pod of common dolphins delighted guests with some playful swimming along side the bow on the return trip home.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Tuesday, 19 July 2016
Tangalooma Flyer greeted with a mother and calf

It was the first time for the Tangalooma Flyer to go out for the whale watch, and the smaller sized vessel was greeted with a mother and calf! the little calf was maybe only 3m long and staying nice and close to its 15m long mother, was a unique experience for guests to see the pair, and then the day was nicely ended with 4 adults swimming right up to the starboard side. A total of 8 Humpback whales, 10 Bottlenose dolphins and 2 green sea turtles were spotted.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Monday, 18 July 2016
Head lunging into the week

What a way to start the working week, with many head lunges seen by one of the adult Humpback whales on today’s whale watch! A head lunge occurs when a whale lunges forward, with most of its head exposed out of the water. This particular behaviour is commonly seen in surface-active groups where male escorts and challengers are vying for a close position to a female. Towards the end of the whale watch, a hammerhead shark was seen 10 metres from the front of the boat, a phenomenal sight to see as this juvenile shark was so curious! A total of 8 Humpback whales were seen on today’s whale watch.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Thursday, 14 July 2016
Whales sighted at Flinders Reef

Was a cloudy day but that didn't stop the Humpback whales from being curious and inquisitve, as they were regularly approaching the vessel. A total of 7 whales were sighted today on board the Tangalooma Jet, with a pod of 3 adult whales that were very curious, doing a couple of circles around the vessel just off Flinders Reef!

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Wednesday, 13 July 2016
Humpbacks on humpday

Today on board the Tangalooma Jet, a total of 7 whales were sighted with most of them spotted just off Cape Moreton. Just 2km off the cape we spotted a pod of three juvenile Humpback whales that were staying close together, doing synchronised surfacing. Juvenile whales tend to stay close together for protection and survival reasons.

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Tuesday, 12 July 2016
Juveniles putting on a show

The whales were fairly elusive at the start of the cruise, but things got exciting when a pod of three juveniles became curious with the Tangalooma Jet. The young Humpback whales got up close with the vessel surfacing on either side, being very inqusitive and intriqued with the Tangalooma Jet. From then, whales were sighted the whole way up to the return trip home with 11 sighted for they day!

  

Eco Ranger Corey

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Monday, 11 July 2016
Whalecome to the world!

Whalecome to the world!

Today’s whale watch whalecomed new life, with a new born calf sighted with its mum! Guests on the Tangalooma Jet were delighted to see this adorable young calf enjoying the waters off Cape Moreton. It’s quite incredible to think that these calves drink 200 litres of milk from their mums each day, which is the equivalent of 1,000 glasses of milk! For calves, 50-60 kilograms of weight is gained each day. When calves are first born, they weigh 1.5 tons, which is considerably light compared to the adults weighing up to 45 tons! A total of 9 Humpback whales were seen on today’s whale watch.

Eco Ranger Tessa

Posted by Tangalooma Marine
Sunday, 10 July 2016
Tails up in the air!

Wow, what a fantastic whale watch today! Guests on board the Tangalooma Jet were amazed at the incredible displays the Humpback whales put on for us, particularly from a pod of 3 young adults. These whales stayed around us for the entire whale watch and entertained us with plenty of tails and pectoral fins waving around up in the air! We were also delighted to see a pod of 15 Common dolphins playing around these whales, an interesting sight as they are cousins in the animal world. Towards the end of the whale watch, another 2 pods approached us and all 7 whales were keeping us entertained with breaches, head lunges, peduncle throws and pectoral fin slaps! These whales must have been attempting to send a message out to each other. A total of 9 Humpback whales and 15 Common dolphins were viewed today.

Eco Ranger Tessa
Posted by Tangalooma Marine
 
 
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