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Whale Watch Blog

Welcome to the Tangalooma Whale Watch Blog.

 

Here, you can keep up to date with all of the action aboard our whale watching boat, and learn some interesting facts from our Eco Rangers. 

Friday, 25 July 2014
Barely a ripple to be seen..

Absolutely magical conditions for our whale watch today! The water was calm as glass, barely a ripple to be seen. We found our first two humpback whales off the northern end of the island and they turned out to be juveniles heading South. But on our approach they stopped and decided to come over and check us out. We turned the engines off and the pair came right up, within 5 metres of our boat, swimming around us, looking at us from all sides. Thanks to the glassy clear water we could get amazing views of the whole whales swimming just under the surface, which was just spectacular! When you’re able to see the whole length of the body rather than just the back and dorsal fin popping above the surface, it gives you a real appreciation of their size! Humpbacks are the fifth largest of the great whales at up to 15m length. Our vessel is 20m so not a whole lot bigger than a fully grown whale!

Then we continued on to Cape Moreton and found a small pod of five bottlenose dolphins, including a tiny calf, maybe only a few months old. There are quite a lot of dolphins living in the Moreton Bay area with over 600 bottlenose dolphins found in the bay and probably other large populations off the outside of the island. This group were just cruising slowly in the shallows so we could have a nice close look at them before moving on to find a few more whales. Four more whales and a quick pass by Flinders Reef rounded up a spectacular day out off the northern end of Moreton Island for a boatful of happy whale watchers. 

Posted by Ben
 
 
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