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Whale Watch Blog

Welcome to the Tangalooma Whale Watch Blog.

 

Here, you can keep up to date with all of the action aboard our whale watching boat, and learn some interesting facts from our Eco Rangers. 

Thursday, 4 September 2014
Surfing dolphins..

After having to cancel most of our whale watch cruises in the last couple of weeks due to the strong Westerly winds, we were happy to be out on the water again today, in absolutely stunning conditions with barely a ripple to be seen! And just in time to keep an eye out for Migaloo as well, who should be passing by in the next few days. Migaloo of course is the famous white humpback whale, the only confirmed albino humpback in the world, who migrates past our shores every year. Unfortunately there was no sign of him today, but we certainly had a great time watching his normal-coloured fellow whales.

We saw a total of nine humpbacks today, starting out with a pod of four big adults chasing each other. They were probably a female and three males, jostling for position next to her. We saw them breaching a couple of times to show off their strength or dominance and also lunging and charging at each other. Quite exciting for us to watch!

After that we spent some time watching a pod of about 20 bottlenose dolphins including at least two young calves. They came quite close to our boat and seemed to be having a good time surfing the waves and leaping out of the water! It’s always nice to see wild dolphins out there, going about their natural behaviours without being trained or made to perform tricks.

Towards the end of our cruise we found another couple of pods of whales that all seemed to be resting, at least until they were joined by a cheeky dolphin. Upon the dolphin’s arrival the whales seemed to perk up, did a few spyhops to look around above the water and started rolling on the surface and waving their pectoral flippers in the air.

All in all a beautiful day out on the boat with different pods of whales and dolphins around showing off some interesting behaviours. Maybe we’ll get lucky and spot the white whale tomorrow!

Eco Ranger Ina

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Ben
 
 
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