WW2 Relics

Moreton Island's World War 2 remnants

During the early stages of World War II, coastal fortifications were built around Moreton Island. On the western side of Moreton Island lies Fort Cowan Cowan, and Rous Battery on the east, which both made up parts of the defensive systems off the Brisbane coast. These defense systems included anti-aircraft emplacements, command and battery observation posts, underground rooms and accommodation for those offices and men involved. There was even a small hospital at Cowan Cowan.

Fort Cowan Cowan (also known as Cowan Cowan Battery), constructed in 1937, was operational until 1945 however was eventually closed down in 1960. It was officially entered into the Queensland Heritage Register in 2007, categorized as a Gun emplacement/battery.

While much of the remains are sunken into the sand, some of the concrete fortifications can still be seen today and make for an interesting location for photo opportunities and a place to step back in time and reflect on the history of the island during World War II.

Explore and Discover the World War 2 Bunkers & Relics

Step back in time by searching for remnants of past times when exploring the natural beauty of Moreton Island. The island was once a critical part of eastern Australia's defensive systems during World War II, leaving the concrete remains hidden around as a reminder of the past.

World War II saw two large defense batteries built on Moreton Island – one at Cowan Cowan and the second at Toompani (known as the Rous Battery). During the war a naval base and jetty were built at Tangalooma. Although buried in sand, many of the remains of the batteries and other relics are still present on Moreton Island and are of significant Australian historical significance.

These remaining concrete structures provide a great destination for a family walk with a historical and educational purpose.

Head down to the Tangalooma Marine Education and Conservation Centre to find out more about how to find these hidden relics or visit the Moreton Island National Parks website for more information on the Rous Battery walking track.

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